Onlookers watch as a woman leaves a store after breaking the Nazi boycott of Jewish businesses. State Archive of Lower Saxony, Aurich site

Some were neighbours: perpetration, complicity and resistance

Exhibition of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Opening 26 March, 5 pm (online)

Perpetrators, Fellow Travellers and Resistance deals with one of the central of the central questions about the Holocaust: How was the Holocaust possible? The central role of Adolf Hitler and other Nazi leaders is undeniable. leaders is undeniable, but they were dependent on countless others. What role did ordinary people play? Why did so many support the crimes of the Nazis... ...or remained silent? Why did so few help the victims? The realization that the Holocaust was possible because people... in Germany and all of Europe were motivated for various reasons were motivated to consent to or participate in the genocide.., is crucial to learning the lessons of the Holocaust. The Holocaust reminds us that the unthinkable is always is possible. It also reminds us that individuals have more... power than they may know - for better or for worse. bad. The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum hopes.., ...that this exhibition will inspire us to consider our own possibilities... for a better future.

Due to the Corona Protection Ordinance, VISITING THE EXHIBITION is only possible by appointment. We allocate timeslots of one hour and admit a maximum of 20 people. The visit to the exhibition is free of charge. Please note: You will need a negative corona test upon entry. Only so-called citizen tests (not older than 24 hours), which have been carried out and certified at the official test centres, are valid for admission. Quick tests for home use, for example from discount stores or supermarkets, are not permitted according to the currently valid Conora Protection Ordinance.

Possible dates (BETWEEN 11-15 AM)

April 10,
April 11
April 17,
April 18,
April 24
April 25

Registration for a visit to the exhibition: Please fill out our contact form. We will get back to you manually whether a visit is possible on the requested date.

Lecture by Samuel Salzborn, anti-Semitism commissioner Berlin: "All Victims, No Perpetrators? The Shoa in German Memory"

3/31, 7:00 p.m.

The confrontation with National Socialism and the Shoah the Shoah was long considered a German success story. In the process, the history of the defense against guilt and remembrance, the perpetrator-victim reversal, the self-stylization as a victim and anti-Semitic projection, which have left a lasting mark on which have left a lasting mark on German society. Samuel Salzborn is an adjunct professor of political science at the University of Giessen and contact person of the state of Berlin on anti-Semitism.

Due to the Corona Protection Ordinance, participation in the lecture is only possible online. We will gladly send you the link after your registration. The registration is free of charge for you.

Registration Online Lecture: Samuel Salzborn

Lecture Dr. Imke Hansen (Lüneburg), "Behind the Scenes of Remembrance. The Auschwitz-Birkenau Symbol in History Politics and Memorials 1945-2010"

08.04., 7.30 p.m.

More than two million people now visit the Auschwitz-Birkenau memorial site every year. Interest in the site is growing steadily, while other extermination camps such as Sobibor or Treblinka are being forgotten.

The term Auschwitz, just like the image of the Birkenau Gate, has become a universally recognizable symbol of the Holocaust. But how did this meaning develop? What happens behind the facades of the memorial? What controversies and dogmas shape the commemoration in and of Auschwitz-Birkenau?

The historian Dr. Imke Hansen specializes in interdisciplinary research on violence, in particular on the representation of the experience of violence.

Due to the Corona Protection Ordinance, participation in the lecture is only possible online. We will gladly send you the link after your registration. The registration is free of charge for you.

Registration online lecture: Dr. Imke Hansen

Lecture by Matthias Küntzel:
"Nazis and the Middle East: How Islamic Anti-Semitism arose"

April 20, 7.30 pm

In 1937, with the pamphlet "Islam and Judaism", a new form of hatred of Jews a new form of Jew-hatred came into the world: Islamic anti-Semitism. The National Socialists did everything they could to spread this new message of hatred with the help of their Arabic-language radio propaganda. The book sheds light on this chapter of Germany's past that has been unknown until now. It presents new archival findings that prove how the image of the Jews in Islam between 1937 and 1948 under the influence of this propaganda propaganda and other Nazi activities. This new perspective on Middle Eastern history enables a more precise assessment of the present: What exactly is "Islamic anti-Semitism"? "Islamic anti-Semitism"? How does it currently appear in Germany and France? What makes it particularly dangerous? Only when we understand how strongly modern Middle Eastern history is marked by the aftermath by the aftermath of National Socialism, will we be able to understand the hatred of Jews in this region and its echoes among Muslims in Muslims in Europe and develop adequate countermeasures. countermeasures.

Due to the Corona Protection Ordinance, participation in the lecture is only possible online. We will gladly send you the link after your registration. The registration is free of charge for you.

Registration online lecture: Matthias Küntzel

Digital guided tours through the special exhibition

April 17, 1:000 p.m. and April 22, 7:00 p.m.

Sandra Franz, head of the NS-Dokumentationsstelle Krefeld, will explain the exhibition using selected examples and invites visitors to discuss complicity, resistance and the grey areas in between. 

Due to the Corona Protection Ordinance, participation in the lecture is only possible online. We will gladly send you the link after your registration to ns-doku@krefeld.de. The registration is free of charge for you.

Registration digital guided tour (please specify date)